Ann M. Catino: Lawyer with Halloran & Sage LLP

Ann M. Catino

Partner
Hartford,  CT  U.S.A.
Phone860-297-4682

Peer Rating
 4.4/5.0
BV® Distinguished

Client Rating

Featured BV Peer Review Rated Lawyer IconFeatured BV Peer Review Rated Lawyer Icon
Printer Friendly VersionEmail this PageDownload to My Outlook ContactsAdd lawyer to My FavoritesCompare this lawyer to other lawyers in your favorites

Experience & Credentials Ratings & Reviews
 

Practice Areas

  • Environmental & Land Use
     
    University St. Anselm College, A.B., 1982; Syracuse University, Maxwell School, M.P.A., 1983
     
    Law SchoolUniversity of Kentucky College of Law, J.D., 1987
     
    Admitted1987, Connecticut; 1988, District of Connecticut
     
    Memberships 

    Associations:
    Connecticut Bar Association -
    Environmental Law Section
    Society of Women Environmental
    Professionals
    The Real Estate Exchange
    The Connecticut Women's Council
    Environmental Policies Council, CT
    Business & Industries Association
    Environmental Professionals Organization
    of Connecticut
    Construction Institute Board of Advisors

     
    BornHartford, Connecticut, October 14, 1960
     
    Biography

    Ann Catino practices primarily in the areas of environmental, utilities, and land use law. Ann represents private and public sector clients in matters involving land use and real estate development, the purchase and sale of contaminated property, permitting and regulatory compliance and auditing; property remediation and environmental litigation. She appears regularly before federal and state environmental and siting agencies, local regulatory boards and all courts in superfund litigation, private cost recovery claims and federal/state enforcement actions. She regularly represents clients and appears before the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection (DEEP), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Connecticut Siting Council, and numerous local commissions and authorities. She is particularly familiar with adjudicatory proceedings at the Connecticut DEEP having represented applicants for solid waste and water permits in contested cases where concerns regarding the Connecticut Environmental Protection Act are raised. And, she has defended numerous orders that have resulted in hearings on behalf of her clients. Ann also has litigated various commercial cases, environmental claims, and citizen suits arising under both federal and state environmental laws.

    Ann has experience in representing and counseling clients in all environmental media - air, water, solid waste and remediation. She has also represented development projects - including power plant development, alternative waste water treatment facilities, various retail development, gas stations, manufacturers, entertainment venues - including the development of the Meadows Music Theater over a 1920s urban landfill. The Meadows was the first facility of its kind financed through the state's urban sites program and tax increment financing. She has permitted a variety of solid waste facilities including transfer stations, recycling and volume reduction facilities successfully. As clients transfer property, she also has assisted them in the transfer of permits, compliance with the Transfer Act and brownfield and contaminated property redevelopment.

    Ann provided counsel to the State during the recent renovation and redevelopment of twenty-three service plaza facilities on Routes I-95, I-395 and 15. The project, over the long term, changed the face of the State's fuel and food facilities. She also negotiated an exceptionally lucrative resolution for the costs associated with the cleanup of historical contamination at the service plazas with the prior retail petroleum provider, which avoided years of litigation.

    From 2006 to the present, Ann serves as Co-Chair of the State's Task Force on Brownfields Strategies (now named the Brownfield Working Group), which advises the legislature on issues involving brownfields, property remediation and economic development. In 2010 she served on the State's Permitting Task Force, and in 2011 served on the transition team for environmental issues. Ann testifies regularly on environmental bills before the Connecticut General Assembly and volunteers many hours to these initiatives in order to develop practical, cost effective laws that are also protective of the environment. As a result, she often is asked to assist in the development of new laws and regulatory initiatives.

    Ann is a past Chair of the Environmental Law Section of the Connecticut Bar Association and on the Board of Advisors for the Construction Institute. She is a member of many organizations including the Connecticut Women's Council, Society of Women Environmental Professionals, Environmental Professionals Organization of Connecticut, Real Estate Exchange, the Environmental Policies Council of Connecticut Business and Industries Association, the MetroHartford Alliance Strategic Partners, and the Connecticut Chapter of the National Brownfields Association.

    Ann has been named for the Top 25: 2014 Women Connecticut Super Lawyers. She also has been selected five times in the past 8 years by Super Lawyers in areas of Environmental, Land Use / Zoning and Environmental Litigation. In 2014, she was nominated for their Business Edition in Construction, Real Estate & Environmental. Ann has been recognized by the The Best Lawyers in America in the categories of Litigation - Environmental as well as Litigation - Land Use & Zoning since 2013. In addition, Ann has been recognized by Chambers USA for three consecutive years in the Environment section, earning a Band 3 ranking in 2014.

    Since 2011, Ann has served on the St. Anselm College Board of Trustees and she chairs the Facilities and Technology Committee as part of her Board responsibilities.

     
    Reported CasesRepresentative Matter: Large Regional Bank Represented in Loan Facilities to CT Property Manager/Developer; Halloran & Sage represented a large regional bank in the negotiation, documentation and closing of mortgage and construction loan facilities to a Connecticut property manager and developer. The Firm, led by real estate partner James Maher, environmental partner Ann Catino and attorney Casey O'Connell, assisted the lender in navigating through the resolution of environmental issues with respect to the subject property and to promptly close and fund the loan within a strict year-end timeframe.; H & S Obtains Favorable Result in Environmental Matter; Ann Catino, a partner in the Environmental and Land Use Group, and Joseph Fortner, Jr., a partner in the Business and Commercial Litigation Group, of Halloran & Sage recently secured a ruling from the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut, disposing of virtually all claims asserted against its municipal client in an environmental class action. This decision is a substantial victory for municipalities and for clients who undertake investigation and remedial responsibilities pursuant to a Consent Order with an administrative agency.; In Collins, et al. v. Olin Corp., et al., 3:03CV945 (CFD), the Town of Hamden was sued by some of its residents, who claimed that their homes had been built on locations used as dumps in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The plaintiffs sued the Town, and the successor of the company which allegedly generated and disposed of industrial waste. Their claims included certain common law and statutory claims for damages and injunctive relief, including claims for negligence, abnormally dangerous activity, recklessness, nuisance and other specific claims arising various state and federal environmental laws. The plaintiffs filed their action immediately after a Consent Order was entered by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection between the Town, the company co-defendant, and certain other parties DEP alleged to be responsible for the environmental conditions existing at a middle school, public parks and approximately 300 homes. The Consent Order allocated responsibility among the parties and provided that the Town was to investigate and remediate only the public parks; Olin was to investigate and remediate the residential neighborhood. The residents, proposing class status, requested the Court to essentially undue the allocation of responsibility set forth in the Consent Order and requested the Town to undertake investigation and remediation of the very conditions that were covered in the DEP administrative proceeding. Halloran & Sage moved to dismiss all claims ordering the Town to undertake such actions, and, while the motion to dismiss was pending, also moved for partial summary judgment precluding any assessment of damages against the town under the doctrine of governmental immunity.; In his decision dated February 28, 2006, the Hon. Christopher Droney, U.S.D.J., ruled in favor of the Town on both motions. First, the court dismissed the claims for injunctive relief under the doctrine of primary jurisdiction. The Court readily acknowledged that the lawsuit would largely undue the allocation of responsibility set forth in the Consent Order and that the decisions required for proper remediation of the properties are more properly within the environmental agency's field of expertise and discretion.; The court next granted summary disposition of the claims alleging negligence, gross negligence, negligence per se, and negligent infliction of emotional distress, on the grounds that the doctrine of governmental immunity barred those claims and any claims for damages. While the plaintiffs had been given an opportunity to search for any evidence reflecting that the Town engaged in a proprietary function in allegedly permitting the filling of waste materials in the low-lying areas, the court concluded that the historical Town records indisputably show that any filling activities or control of filling by the Town occurred to redress and control mosquito breeding places and the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses. Further, the plaintiffs could not demonstrate that the Town received any proprietary benefit from the development of homes, parks and a school other than the general benefits arising from the normal growth and development of a residential community. Fees from building permits, certificates of occupancy or even an enhanced tax base were not considered by the Court to represent proprietary acts. Similarly, despite plaintiffs' best efforts to create a factual dispute about the Town's recklessness, in allowing such filling and future development, the court noted that the Town needed to control landfilling and garbage collection and disposal activities primarily to address issues of health and safety present at the time and that there was no evidence at the relevant time that this landfill material posed a health or safety threat to later developers. Thus, with the exception of a single claim under CERCLA (regarding which a motion has yet to be filed), all substantive claims against the Town have been effectively dismissed.; The significance of the decision lies in (1) the court's discussion of the application of governmental immunity and whether a municipality can be sued for disposal and filling activities that happens within the municipality when any such activity allegedly permitted or conducted by the Town is for the benefit of its citizens at the time and (2) that a party to a Consent Order cannot be required to perform a clean up independent of or separate from any agreements (eg., a Consent Order) that party has with DEP.; Larry Weisman and Ann Catino Obtain Favorable Decision From Westport Planning and Zoning Commission; Larry Weisman and Ann Catino recently obtained a favorable decision from the Westport Planning and Zoning Commission, which voted to approve construction of a new 102,000 square foot Westport Weston Family Y on a 32 acre parcel adjacent to the Merritt Parkway and bordered by the Saugatuck River. Eric Bernheim also assisted in this matter.; This final decision followed approvals from various town bodies and the Connecticut DEP, as well as many hours of hearings and deliberations by the Planning and Zoning Commission. This was the longest application in the history the Commission.; H & S Obtains Approval for an On-Site Wastewater Treatment System; Larry Weisman and Ann Catino recently obtained a favorable ruling from the Department of Environmental Protection ( DEP ) for an on-site wastewater treatment system. The decision recommended approval of an application for an engineered sub-surface system with a design capacity of 34,000 gallons per day to support a proposed 102,000 square foot new YMCA facility serving the Towns of Westport and Weston, CT.; A tentative determination regarding the application was originally issued in May, 2006, but upon receipt of a petition,extensive, contested public hearings were held. After considering the testimony and information offered at the hearings and evaluating the merits of the project, the DEP hearing officer concluded that the discharge that would result if the installation were to receive a permit would adequately protect the waters of the state. A complete copy of the ruling can be accessed here.; Uniroyal Chemical Company v. Town of Middlebury, 2006 WL 962210 (2d Cir. 2006); In a major Superfund clean-up case, the court upheld the allocation of interest on clean-up costs on a pro-rate basis, consistent with the allocation of the underlying costs.; H & S Obtains a Summary Disposition of Claims Against Municipal Client; Ann Catino, a partner in the Environmental and Land Use Group, and Joseph Fortner, Jr., a partner in the Business and Commercial Litigation Group, of Halloran & Sage recently secured a ruling from the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut, disposing of virtually all claims asserted against its municipal client in an environmental class action. This decision is a substantial victory for municipalities and for clients who undertake investigation and remedial responsibilities pursuant to a Consent Order with an administrative agency.; In Collins, et al. v. Olin Corp., et al., 3:03CV945 (CFD), the Town of Hamden was sued by some of its residents, who claimed that their homes had been built on locations used as dumps in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The plaintiffs sued the Town, and the successor of the company which allegedly generated and disposed of industrial waste. Their claims included certain common law and statutory claims for damages and injunctive relief, including claims for negligence, abnormally dangerous activity, recklessness, nuisance and other specific claims arising various state and federal environmental laws. The plaintiffs filed their action immediately after a Consent Order was entered by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection between the Town, the company co-defendant, and certain other parties DEP alleged to be responsible for the environmental conditions existing at a middle school, public parks and approximately 300 homes. The Consent Order allocated responsibility among the parties and provided that the Town was to investigate and remediate only the public parks; Olin was to investigate and remediate the residential neighborhood. The residents, proposing class status, requested the Court to essentially undue the allocation of responsibility set forth in the Consent Order and requested the Town to undertake investigation and remediation of the very conditions that were covered in the DEP administrative proceeding. Halloran & Sage moved to dismiss all claims ordering the Town to undertake such actions, and, while the motion to dismiss was pending, also moved for partial summary judgment precluding any assessment of damages against the town under the doctrine of governmental immunity.; In his decision dated February 28, 2006, the Hon. Christopher Droney, U.S.D.J., ruled in favor of the Town on both motions. First, the court dismissed the claims for injunctive relief under the doctrine of primary jurisdiction. The Court readily acknowledged that the lawsuit would largely undue the allocation of responsibility set forth in the Consent Order and that the decisions required for proper remediation of the properties are more properly within the environmental agency's field of expertise and discretion.; The court next granted summary disposition of the claims alleging negligence, gross negligence, negligence per se, and negligent infliction of emotional distress, on the grounds that the doctrine of governmental immunity barred those claims and any claims for damages. While the plaintiffs had been given an opportunity to search for any evidence reflecting that the Town engaged in a proprietary function in allegedly permitting the filling of waste materials in the low-lying areas, the court concluded that the historical Town records indisputably show that any filling activities or control of filling by the Town occurred to redress and control mosquito breeding places and the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses. Further, the plaintiffs could not demonstrate that the Town received any proprietary benefit from the development of homes, parks and a school other than the general benefits arising from the normal growth and development of a residential community. Fees from building permits, certificates of occupancy or even an enhanced tax base were not considered by the Court to represent proprietary acts. Similarly, despite plaintiffs' best efforts to create a factual dispute about the Town's recklessness, in allowing such filling and future development, the court noted that the Town needed to control landfilling and garbage collection and disposal activities primarily to address issues of health and safety present at the time and that there was no evidence at the relevant time that this landfill material posed a health or safety threat to later developers. Thus, with the exception of a single claim under CERCLA (regarding which a motion has yet to be filed), all substantive claims against the Town have been effectively dismissed.; The significance of the decision lies in (1) the court's discussion of the application of governmental immunity and whether a municipality can be sued for disposal and filling activities that happens within the municipality when any such activity allegedly permitted or conducted by the Town is for the benefit of its citizens at the time and (2) that a party to a Consent Order cannot be required to perform a clean up independent of or separate from any agreements (eg., a Consent Order) that party has with DEP.; Counsel for Construction of a Transmission Cable; Halloran & Sage secured the permitting for the construction of a 300 MW HVDC transmission cable running under Long Island Sound from New Haven to Shoreham, New York. This project included obtaining approvals from the Connecticut Siting Council, the DEP, Coast Guard, the Army Corps of Engineers, National Marine Fisheries and negotiating settlement agreements with certain affected interests including the Soundkeeper and the Department of Agriculture. In addition, the development of this project, and its associated substation, AC interconnect and tower has involved attorneys from all areas of our Firm: energy, environmental and land use, real estate, finance, and our appellate group. Our attorneys prepared the necessary documents for acquiring the fee and easements to the real estate, securing advanced financing, and obtaining the approvals from the Department of Public Utility Control.; Counsel for Superfund Litigation; Halloran & Sage attorneys served as lead joint defense counsel for the general waste stream defendants and co-defense counsel for the municipal defendants in the private cost recovery trial of the two most notorious Superfund sites in the state, the Beacon Heights and Laurel Park landfills. During the course of the trial and in further proceedings before the Federal District Court, we became lead counsel for all 20+ municipalities involved in this litigation. The trial, which spanned six months, involved presenting novel cost-allocation models for the apportionment of the clean-up costs among all parties. Our representation included numerous appeals to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals and relitigating certain unique issues upon remand, such as the calculation of pre-judgment and post-judgment interest under CERCLA and the effect of deposits made to the federal court registry on the calculation of interest. Our involvement in this case gave us unparalleled experience in municipal commercial and industrial liability issues arising under federal and state law relating to municipal solid waste, landfill operation and closure and Superfund liability.; Counsel for the Development of a Major Entertainment Venue; The development of the Meadows Music Theatre involved transforming an old urban landfill into a state of the art 30,000 person outdoor concert facility. Working with DEP and the state, urban site Brownfield funding was obtained and the site remediated primarily through the installation of a complex cap and redeveloped into one of the premier concert facilities in the state. State permits were obtained and local approvals from the City of Hartford and Hartford Redevelopment Authority were received in order to develop this one-of-a-kind facility. This was the first project of its scale to be permitted through the state's urban site remediation program and is a proud accomplishment not only for the developers but for the state.
     
    ISLN908473654
     


    View Ratings & Reviews
    Profile Visibility
    #320 in weekly profile views out of 4,401 lawyers in Hartford, Connecticut
    #104,423 in weekly profile views out of 1,708,981 total lawyers Overall

    Office Information

    Ann M. Catino

    225 Asylum Street
    HartfordCT 06103




    Loading...
     

    Professional Networking for Legal Professionals Only

    Quickly and easily expand your professional
    network - join the premier global network for legal professionals only. It's powered by the
    Martindale-Hubbell database - over 1,000,000 lawyers strong.
    Join Now