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Consumers Report Smoking Batteries in Baby Toy




by:
James P. Nevin
Brayton Purcell, LLP - Novato Office

 
February 19, 2014

Previously published on February 18, 2014

The Ocean Wonders Soothe & Glow Seahorse has been dubbed 'the perfect companion for your little one'. With a soft glowing light and long­play music to calm baby and help create a peaceful environment perfect for bedtime. While there are hundreds of satisfied customers who purport that the Seahorse does exactly as described, soothing their baby to sleep and becoming a beloved childhood toy, other parents are less than satisfied.

The website saferproducts.gov has consumer posts about this toy smoking when the batteries are replaced. Allegedly, the battery coil becomes red hot and begins to emit smoke upon replacement of the batteries. This first battery replacement seems to take place after about 10 months of daily use of the product. While there have been no reports of an actual fire or any injuries to children, some parents are understandably concerned. The possibility of a product, designed to be left in the crib with an unattended baby overnight, potentially catching fire is terrifying to parents who have voiced their concerns on the Fisher­Price Facebook page. Their concerns have not gone unnoticed. The toy distributor has encouraged concerned parents to send their Seahorse back to the company for inspection and replacement.

Some parents are upset that Fisher­Price has failed to voluntarily recall the Soothe & Glow Seahorse product line as a whole. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), a U.S. government agency that protects the American public from products that may create a potential hazard to safety, focuses on consumer products that pose an unreasonable risk of fire, chemical exposure, electrical malfunction, or mechanical failure. Though they also claim to put a high priority on products that expose children to danger and injury the Seahorse has yet to be investigated or recalled. Perhaps this lack of recall should reassure parents of the safety of the product, or perhaps it should create public concern on the scrutiny of the CPSC. Either way, if you have a Soothe & Glow Seahorse at home keep a watchful eye on it once you replace the batteries.



 

The views expressed in this document are solely the views of the author and not Martindale-Hubbell. This document is intended for informational purposes only and is not legal advice or a substitute for consultation with a licensed legal professional in a particular case or circumstance.
 

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James P. Nevin
Practice Area
 
Products Liability
 
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