• GM Recall Update: Full GM Recall List
  • July 29, 2014 | Author: Todd A. Walburg
  • Law Firm: Lieff, Cabraser, Heimann & Bernstein, LLP - San Francisco Office
  • General Motors announced on June 30, 2014 the recall of another 8.4 million automobiles, bringing the total number of vehicles recalled by GM this year to over 29 million worldwide. Out of the total number of vehicles recalled, 8.2 million are linked to the faulty key ignition system that causes vehicles to lose power.

    The newly recalled GM vehicles with faulty key systems and ignition switches are as follows:

    • Chevrolet Impala - 2000-2005
    • Chevrolet Malibu - 1997-2005
    • Chevrolet Monte Carlo - 2000-2005
    • Cadillac CTS - 2003-2014
    • Cadillac SRX - 2004-2006
    • Oldsmobile Aero - 1999-2004
    • Oldsmobile Intrigue - 1998-2002
    • Pontiac Grand Am - 1999-2005
    • Pontiac Grand Prix - 2004-2008

    The earlier GM cars recalled for the defective ignition switch are as follows:

    • Buick Lacrosse - 2005-2009
    • Buick Lucerne - 2006-2011
    • Buick Regal LS & GS - 2004-2005
    • Camaro - 2010-2014
    • Chevrolet Cobalt - 2005-2010
    • Chevrolet HHR - 2006-2011
    • Chevrolet Impala - 2006-2014
    • Chevrolet Monte Carlo - 2006-2008
    • Cadillac Deville - 2000-2005
    • Cadillac DTS - 2004-2011
    • Opel GT - 2007
    • Pontiac G5 - 2007-2010
    • Pontiac Pursuit - 2005-2006
    • Pontiac Solstice - 2006-2010
    • Saturn Ion - 2003-2007
    • Saturn Sky - 2007-2010

    In 2001, GM received its first report of a possible defect with the ignition switch design, where the key could suddenly turn the engine off due to extra weight on the key ring or if the vehicle goes over rough terrains. The first death was reported in 2005 when a 16-year-old girl from Maryland died after her 2005 Chevrolet Cobalt crashed. It was more than a decade, however, before GM publicly issued the first of a series of recalls in February 2014 with 2.6 million cars.

    Lawmakers and safety advocates have charged that GM had a repeated pattern of deliberately ignoring safety issues. As noted by the New York Times, "The Cobalt crisis and GM's subsequent internal investigation shed light on years of lax safety practices. Fifteen employees have been dismissed for their roles in allowing the original ignition defect to go unrepaired for more than a decade, and regulators imposed a $35 million penalty for failing to report the problem in a timely manner."