• Contemporaneous Documentation is Not Always a Good Thing
  • October 15, 2014 | Author: Michael H. Payne
  • Law Firm: Cohen Seglias Pallas Greenhall & Furman PC - Philadelphia Office
  • There is no question that documentation is an important part in the resolution of any construction dispute. Particularly contemporaneous documents - documents that are created at the time that events occur. Quality control reports, daily logs, and timely letters all fall into the “contemporaneous” category. Another type, however, has an instantaneous characteristic that not only makes it contemporaneous, but so current as to be potentially dangerous - e-mail. This form of documentation cannot only be useful to record events virtually as soon as they occur, but it also has become a vehicle for the expression of emotions without the benefit of reflection.

    Every contractor, for example, has had the occasion to be angered by something that another contractor, vendor, or owner has done during the performance of a construction project. If the subject of that anger, or disagreement, could lead to a request for additional compensation, there is often a knee-jerk reaction to put something in writing. Many of us have hurriedly drafted a letter and then, feeling better for having written it, crumpled the paper and tossed it into the nearest wastebasket. It has a therapeutic value and no harm is done. In our Information Age, however, with the ability to compose e-mail messages on our computers, iPads, and smartphones, the opportunity for reflection is gone as soon as we hit the “Send” button.

    As an attorney, this often creates a serious problem when those messages are sent by a prime contractor to a sub, or by a sub to the prime. What both parties seem to fail to recognize is that these instantaneously transmitted messages not only record past events and express current thoughts, they may also have a dramatic effect on the future outcome of a dispute. What happens when the prime accuses the sub of poor workmanship and later seeks to blame the owner for providing a defective specification that actually caused the problem? That e-mail message, sent hastily to the subcontractor before all the facts were known, may become a useful document to the owner during litigation. The question, on cross-examination, will be “Isn’t is true that you believed that the problem was poor workmanship by your subcontractor, and not any defect in the specifications?” If the problem really is a defective specification, the ill-advised e-mail message has provided a potential defense to the owner and has introduced uncertainty into the dispute where none may have otherwise existed.

    The lesson in all of this is that all parties should think about the possible consequences of the emotions and feelings they are expressing. There is no question that the facts, such as the working conditions, equipment, and manpower at the site must be recorded promptly and accurately. If the accurate recording of events affects the outcome of a dispute, it probably means that justice has been done. Expressions of emotions and opinions that are not well thought-out are in a different category, however and, when conveyed in e-mail messages, they are an unwelcome byproduct of the Information Age. E-mail messages, and all forms of Electronically Stored Information (“ESI”), are just as discoverable by the other side as paper documents. My advice is to be careful and think about the possible future impact of writing, and instantaneously transmitting, things that do not need to be said. Not every form of contemporaneous documentation is a good idea.