• Advanced Internet Copyright Issues
  • December 19, 2003 | Author: David L. Hayes
  • Law Firm: Fenwick & West LLP - San Francisco Office
  • Traditional copyright law was designed to deal primarily with the creation, distribution and sale of protected works in tangible copies. In a world of tangible distribution, it is generally easy to know when a "copy" has been made. The nature of the Internet, however, is such that it is often difficult to know precisely whether a "copy" of a work has been made and, if so, where it resides at any given time within the network. As described further below, information is sent through the Internet using a technology known as "packet switching," in which data is broken up into smaller units, or "packets," and the packets are sent as discrete units. As these packets pass through the random access memory (RAM) of each interim computer node on the network, are "copies" of the work being made?