• The EEOC Filed its First Lawsuits under GINA, Giving Employers a Reminder to Update their Policies and Practices to Avoid Liability
  • June 21, 2013 | Author: Heidi N. Hartman
  • Law Firm: Eastman & Smith Ltd. - Toledo Office
  • Since the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) became effective in January 2009, employers who have more than 15 employees have been prohibited from: 1) using genetic information to discriminate in employment; 2) requesting or requiring genetic information from or purchasing genetic information about employees; and 3) disclosing employee genetic information. Genetic information as defined by GINA includes an individual’s family medical history, the results of an individual’s or family members’ genetic tests, the fact that an individual or an individual’s family member sought or received genetic services, and genetic information of a fetus carried by an individual or an individual’s family member or an embryo lawfully held by an individual or family member receiving assistive reproductive services.