• U.S. Supreme Court to Tackle the EEOC’s Duty to Conciliate
  • July 16, 2014 | Authors: Melinda Burdick Bowe; John F. Corcoran; Lindsey H. Hazelton; John T. McCann; Robert J. Thorpe
  • Law Firm: Hancock Estabrook, LLP - Syracuse Office
  • On June 30, 2014, the United States Supreme Court granted an employer’s petition for certiorari to address whether a court may dissect the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) obligation under Title VII of the Federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) to conciliate discrimination claims before filing suit and, relatedly, whether employers can use the EEOC’s failure to conciliate as an affirmative defense.  Mach Mining, LLC v. E.E.O.C., 738 F.3d 171 (7th Cir. 2013), cert. granted, No. 13-1019, 2014 WL 713205 (June 30, 2014).  The Court’s decision to address the EEOC’s duty to conciliate has the potential to significantly change the landscape of employment discrimination cases.