• Nassar Scandal Has Far-Reaching Consequences
  • March 8, 2018 | Authors: Jacob E. Roussel; Rachael M. Coe; John T. Andrishok; Leo C. Hamilton; Jerry L. Stovall; Rachael Jeanfreau; E. Fredrick Preis; Steven B. Loeb; Melissa M. Shirley; Eve B. Masinter; Sunny Mayhall West
  • Law Firms: Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. - Baton Rouge Office; Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson, L.L.P. - Baton Rouge Office
  • Former United States Olympic Team Doctor, USA Gymnastics (USAG) Doctor and Michigan State University (MSU) Doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced on Wednesday, January 24 to 40 to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing over 150 women and girls over 20 years after agreeing to plead guilty in a deal with the Michigan Attorney General. However, Nassar's sentence will have consequences that reach far beyond his own actions. Already, the entire USA Gymnastics Board resigned after an ultimatum from the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC), the Michigan State University President and Athletic Director have resigned, and three investigations have been ordered: one requested by MSU for the Michigan Attorney General to investigate the university's response to the abuse, one by the NCAA into MSU's handling of the accusations received by girls for years, and another by the State of Texas into the Karolyi Ranch in Huntsville, Texas where USA Gymnastics hosts all National Team training sessions. Nassar's sentencing was preceded by seven days of victim testimony as part of the plea deal. In several of their statements, victims called for independent investigations into MSU, USAG and the USOC to find out just how much was known about Nassar's actions and why nothing was done to stop him. Along with the investigations, USAG reversed its training contract with the Karolyi Ranch where many athletes claimed Nassar had unfettered access to abuse them with no oversight. There have also been civil suits filed by alleged victims aimed at MSU and USAG claiming the institutions had enabled Nassar's abuse and attempted to silence those who came forward. MSU and the USAG reportedly filed motions to dismiss the cases, citing the cases were past the statute of limitations. With the sentencing over and the multitude of investigations now beginning, it is almost certain there will be more resignations and potentially criminal charges brought against the institutions.