• 2012 Mid-Year Update on Corporate Deferred Prosecution and Non-Prosecution Agreements
  • July 14, 2012 | Authors: Mark T. Doerr; Steven J. Tave; F. Joseph Warin
  • Law Firms: Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP - New York Office ; Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP - Los Angeles Office
  • Deferred Prosecution Agreements ("DPAs") and Non-Prosecution Agreements ("NPAs") (collectively, "agreements") in recent years have become a primary tool of the U.S. Department of Justice ("DOJ") for resolving allegations of corporate criminal wrongdoing. Since 2000, DOJ entities have entered into 230 reported agreements with corporate entities, extracting a total of $31.6 billion in fines, penalties, forfeitures, and related civil settlements. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"), which announced the adoption of DPAs and NPAs as part of its Cooperation Initiative in January 2010, has since entered into three NPAs without monetary penalties and one DPA, which included disgorgement. With these agreements, companies obtain finality and closure and agree not to commit further legal violations and to undertake specific cooperation and compliance obligations in exchange for DOJ or the SEC agreeing to forgo enforcement action. In the DOJ context, the two agreement types differ in one material respect: for DPAs, DOJ files a criminal information in federal court, while NPAs generally are not filed in court.